Movie Review


Free Fire

  Free Fire   Directed by: Ben Wheatley Starring: Sharlto Copley, Brie Larson, Sam Riley, Cillian Murphy, Babou Ceesay, Jack Reynor and Armie Hammer Rated: R Run Time: 1h 30min Genre: Action, Crime, Thriller 4 Frames out of 5 By: Shari K. Green   Free Fire is another terrific A24 release.  They seem to be […]


Born In China – Movie Review   Recently updated !

  Born In China   Directed by: Chuan Lu Narrated by: John Krasinski amd Xun Zhou Rated: G Run Time: 1h 16 mins Genre: Documentary 4 Frames out of 5 By: Shari K. Green   In this beautiful Disneynature documentary, we find ourselves in China.  We meet a female Snow Leopard named Dewa, alone with […]


Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer – Movie Review   Recently updated !

  Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer   Directed by: Joseph Cedar Starring: Stars: Richard Gere, Lior Ashkenazi, Michael Sheen, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Dan Stevens, Josh Charles and Steve Buscemi Rated: R Run Time: 1h 57min Genre: Drama, Thriller By: Shari K. Green 4 out of 5 Frames Norman is […]


David Lynch: The Art Life

David Lynch: The Art Life Directed by: Jon Nguyen and co-directed by Rick Barnes and Olivia Neergaard-Holm 4 Frames out of 5 By: Shari K. Green David Lynch, in case you didn’t know, (and it would be a shame if you didn’t because he’s one of the most important artists of our time), is an […]


Odd Brodsky is an indie film you have to see!

ODD BRODSKY Directed by:  Cindy Baer Starring: Tegan Ashton Cohan, Matthew Kevin Anderson, Cindy Baer, Scott Dickert Rated: Run Time: 1h 33mins Genre: Comedy 4 Frames out of 5 By: Shari K. Green Everyone knows independent film is where it’s at these days.  You can’t argue the facts.  Their creators aren’t inhibited like filmmakers working on […]


Raw Movie Review

  RAW   Directed by: Julia Ducournau Starring: Garance Marillier, Ella Rumpf and Rabah Nait Oufella   Rated: R Run Time: 1h 39min Genre: Drama, Horror 4 Frames out of 5 By: Shari K. Green Subtitled   In a word, Raw is… raw.  A movie about cannibalism might frighten you away but keep reading before […]


Car Dogs Movie Review

Car Dogs   Directed by: Adam Collis Starring: Octavia Spencer, George Lopez, Patrick J. Adams, Nia Vardalos, Chris Mulkey, Alessandra Torresani, Josh Hopkins and Wendy Crawford   Rated: R Run Time: 1H, 44mins Genre: Comedy, Drama 3 Frames out of 5 By Shari K. Green   Most of us have been through buying a car, […]


Personal Shopper Movie Review

 

Personal Shopper

 

Directed by: Olivier Assayas

Starring: Kristen Stewart, Lars Eidinger, Sigrid Bouaziz and Nora von Waldstätten

 

Rated: R

Run Time: 1h 45min

Genre: Drama, Mystery, Thriller

4 Frames out of 5

By: Shari K. Green

 

With the roles she’s choosing, Kristen Steward has been redefining herself, and this part was a wise decision made by both she and director Olivier Assayas (Clouds of Sils Maria.)  Having worked with her in the past he knew that when he needed an actress to pull off the look of someone pained and tormented and to also be engaging that Stewart was the best choice.  She was his supporting character is Clouds but this time she carries the entire film as Maureen.  The film is a bit hard to follow at first but give it time.

You’re in the hands of a filmmaker who doesn’t want to reveal anything too soon.  Pacing and all things becoming revealed in due time are critically important.

At first, it’s hard to distinguish what exactly is going on with Maureen.  She’s dark and distant but at the twenty-eight-minute mark, you learn that her twin brother had died of the heart defect they both have.  Not only is she sad, she’s lonely and fears for her own health.  When this comes to light it explains the very beginning of the film where she quietly walks through a dark house looking to make contact with a spirit.

She’s a young American woman working in Paris as a personal shopper for a celebrity during the day but at night she’s a brooding sister waiting for her brother who, before he passed away, promised he’d make contact with her after his death.  They had a pact that whoever died first, the other would reach out from the other side and give them a sign.  She goes to the house she once shared with her brother and hopes to see a manifestation or feel something encouraging so that maybe she can move on with the rest of her life but it doesn’t happen so fast.

 

The audience is on a psychological journey with someone who may very well be better off in treatment but the way the film is rolled out; you don’t pick up on that too soon.  There’s a certain strain put on you to understand Maureen because she seems so fragile but at the same time you’re getting frustrated at some of the decisions she’s making.  Like when she receives text messages from a stranger and she begins to engage.  What so good about this, outside of the overall tone, is it keeps you wondering, is it her brother or is it no one?  Is this happening or is it in her head?  With precision, Assayas does an incredible job of leading you into the trap you don’t see coming.  He uses sound and music as he takes you on this trip where you’re on the edge of your seat for the entire ride, but he doesn’t really end up showing you much of anything.  It’s a refreshing take on the subject and it’s a beautiful piece of art.

Personal Shopper can be creepy at times and those moments are done with a special technique.  She becomes more upset, desperate and even frantic.  The more she does, the more engaged with her character you become.  Maureen, the personal shopper and the girl looking for a spirit, seem to be in two different movies.  Kristen Stewart is so good that these two different entities become one in the end.  She makes what Personal Shopper is, so special.  She keeps you vested with slight changes to her character and Assayas uses everything in his power to keep from exposing the tortured young soul too soon without losing you in the meantime.  Personal Shopper is gripping and intense and a movie I’d have to recommend you see as soon as you can.


Kong: Skull Island Movie Review

 

Directed by: Jordan Vogt-Roberts

Starring: Tom Hiddleston, Samuel L. Jackson, John Goodman, Brie Larson, Jing Tian, John Ortiz, with Terry Notary, and John C. Reilly

Rated: PG-13

Run Time: 2h

Genre: Action, Adventure, Fantasy

3 Frames out of 5

By: Shari K. Green

It’s invigorating to see that Kong: Skull Island isn’t just a remake of King Kong.  It has a few similarities, such as beast still digs beauty, but that’s about all.  It stands alone on its own giving director Vogt-Roberts something to be very proud of having a part in. Speaking of beauty, however, I did like the more substantive presence of the ape in the 1970 movie King Kong, where you could see Jessica Lange pull at Kong as she begs him to not let her go.  This gives you the chance to feel for him much more.  That realism isn’t in this version where Kong is CGI.  However, if you have a heart, you’ll still hope the best for the guy.  Why he keeps falling, literally, for these woman is beyond me, though!  You’d think he’d learn by now!  I digress.

Far be it for me to suggest you can learn something from a monster movie but I’m going to.  You can learn something from this monster movie.  You can learn, if you haven’t already, that sometimes with nature things are better left alone.  Though we don’t always pay attention to it, there is a natural order of things and if you interrupt or disturb that order, in the name of helping mankind, you could be doing just the opposite.  Such is the case here.

Kong is set in the early 70’s in the time of Watergate.  Research scientist Bill Randa (Goodman) is in Washington and looking for some money and a military escort to an uncharted island he’d like to explore for the possible medicinal cures it holds.  Insert political statement here as Randa stands outside and proclaims that there’ll never be a more screwed-up time in Washington.  The Nixon bobblehead is a nice touch, as well.

Randa gets his grant, a photographer (Larson), a rather large escort and his own tracker (Hiddleston); they set off to explore Skull Island which is shrouded by vicious storms.  Going only so far by water, the teams, which are led by Colonel Packard (Jackson), take to the air the rest of the way.  However, once they clear the dangerous weather another danger appears; Kong.  He immediately senses danger and begins to protect his turf which looks more like swatting at flies, to be honest.  This scene was well placed as it’s not too far into the film, wasting no time getting you into some heavy action.  Packard takes the attack personally.  Losing many of his men in the battle he’s now hell-bent on killing the creature.  He must prove to Kong that man is King.  Jackson’s look is fiery and savage as his Packard stares Kong down for a moment before being whisked away at the last minute.  Getting stomped on like a cockroach might have ruined his already horrible day.

Helicopters are scattered and the teams separated.  One group meets an indigenous tribe and Hank Marlow (Reilly), also known as the comic relief, a paratrooper who has been stranded on the island since WWII; twenty-eight years to be exact.  Through Marlow, the team hears all they need to know of who Kong really is… he’s King.  To the people of the island, he’s God.  Without him, the Skullcrawlers would dominate and kill every living thing on the island.  Kong keeps the skeletal creatures in low numbers and below ground.  If not for him, all would perish and not only would they take over the island but they’d begin to take over the planet.

During their lesson, other teams are meeting and in some cases, wiped out, by other inhabitants of the island.  If spiders aren’t your thing… this might not be the movie for you but the thought of taking the mother of all spiders down in a wicked way would be spectacular then remember this is a Kong movie, not a spider movie, and get your butt to the theatre.   What’s left of the team meet and make their way to the destination point so they can leave the island and you can leave the theatre but don’t do that too soon!  There is an after credit scene so make sure you stay all the way until lights up.  What they will be assuring you of here is that the MonsterVerse will continue and who could be coming up next.  If you like monster movies, you’ll like Kong: Skull Island.  You might not like the way Hiddleston over plays his role as Larson’s love interest but the CGI is great and the motion capture performance really pulls you in.  Those reasons alone are worth spending the extra money on seeing this at an IMAX theatre if you can.  ENOY!


Table 19 – Movie Review

“Table 19”

 

Directed by: Jeffrey Blitz

Starring: Anna Kendrick, Craig Robinson, June Squibb, Lisa Kudrow, Stephen Merchant, Tony Revolori, Wyatt Russell and Amanda Crew

2 Frames out of 5

By: Shari K. Green

 

 

If you’ve ever found yourself as the party guest who has been invited to the party but can’t be super involved due to the placement of your table, then you’ll understand why this movie was made.  It was made for all the odd men out who have watched all of the festivities from afar.  So far away in some cases that you can barely even say you were there!  You were practically scuttled off into another room or the hallway, at least this is how you begin to feel.  If you have ever sat and scanned the table in which you’re seated and noticed you’re at a table full of strangers rather than with those who invited you, and your tablemates seem not to fit in with the other guests, you need to do one thing… examine why you’re at that table, too.  Consider this movie a wake-up call if you’ve ignored this happening to you, especially if it has happened more than once.

 

Writers Mark and Jay Duplass have either been there or have put people there; waaay back there at Table 19 because they certainly hit the nail on the head as to how a guest would feel when realizing they’ve been relegated to the outskirts of a given gala or celebration.  They did a good job writing a script that empowers anyone who has felt shunned in this manner.  At a lost, distant table, one can find hope, friendship and maybe love, if they just open their minds to it.  I liked how it championed for those who should have checked no on their RSVP, but the movie goes out of its way to make a few characters likable that just aren’t.

 

It starts off well, revealing Eloise’s’ (Kendrick) reason for being at the bad table.  She’s the ex-girlfriend of the bride’s brother, Teddy (Russell), and now ex-maid of honor.  One by one, explanations for the other characters at the table are established.  They’re even accompanied by flashbacks.  We have some witty banter which at times, especially when dispatched by Walter (Stephen Merchant), have you laughing and at other times has you feeling sorry for this group of misfits, which isn’t good when you made your way to the theatre, promised a comedy, and are having a hard time finding a reason to chuckle.  It is labeled on IMDB as a comedy, drama but who are we kidding?!  Duplass writing for this cast?!  I’ll not highlight that too soon.  Back to the characters.

Jo (Squibb) is a sweet old woman who all but raised the bride and is being treated horribly by her today.  Rezno (Revolori) is an incredibly obnoxious and extremely unfunny virgin who figures, along with his mother, this is where he can land a drunken, foolish young woman to be his first.  Drunk and foolish is what she’d have to be because no one in their right mind would be into this awkward nightmare of a character.  Rezno was simply too far out to be believable and I thought the film would have been so much better had he not been a part of the story.  Kudrow and Robinson are Bina and Jerry, a couple who has been married for years and are falling out of love.  Though at a wedding, they don’t find it an issue at all to air their differences in front of everyone.

 

I liked some of what was going on.  I can’t say that if you enjoy a character driven story that you shouldn’t watch this one but there is a lot wrong with Table 19.  It, at times, shows real promise.  The characters grow and you’re genuinely happy about that.  I was having fun watching these flakes get to know each other and also wanting to help one another through the vexing situation they realize they’re all in but at times I actually found myself looking around the theatre to make sure I knew the location of the emergency exit.  It was all over the place with what kind of movie it wanted to be.

 

I think had the writers focused on one genre, director Jeffrey Blitz (The Office and Parks and Recreation) would have had a much better script to work with.  Choosing drama over comedy then switching back and… my head is spinning!!  It got a little frustrating.  Sure there’s comedy in misery but it was anguishing watching how miserable some of these poor things are.  For Squibb, Robinson and Merchant, I’d say watch this when it hits cable.  It isn’t a terrible waste of your time.  But be sure you’re in the mood for a comedy, I mean, be sure you’re in the mood for a drama… well, you get the drift.  When you don’t know what you want to see, seat yourself at Table 19.  Sometimes that’s where you just find yourself being put but maybe you won’t mind being there.


Before I Fall – Movie Review

“Before I Fall”

 

Directed by: Ry Russo-Young

Starring: Zoey Deutch, Halston Sage, Logan Miller, Kian Lawley, Elena Kampouris, Cynthy Wu, Medalion Rahimi, Diego Boneta and Jennifer Beals

 

Rated: PG-13

Run Time: 1h 39min

Genre: Drama, Mystery

3 Frames out of 5

By: Shari K. Green

 

 

In Greek mythology, Sisyphus was the king of Ephyra (now known as Corinth).  He was punished for his self-aggrandizing craftiness and deceitfulness by being forced to roll an immense boulder up a hill, only to watch it come back to hit him, repeating this action for eternity.  Through the classical influence on modern culture, tasks that are both laborious and futile are therefore described as Sisyphean.  Why is this English lesson pertinent to this review?  It’s not but it’ll help you better understand why it’s used in the movie and will help you grasp the intent behind the yarn.

 

Before I Fall starts with a voice of a young woman, Sam (Deutch), explaining that, ‘people may have a lifetime of days to waste but…’ and then throws some wisdom out that anyone only truly has today and warns that wasting time isn’t how one should see any moment they’re in.  I try not watching the trailers of, or read too much about, movies before I screen them for review so that I don’t have any preconceived notions of what I’m about to see but it was obvious very quickly that I was in for the teenage dramatic version of Ground Hogs Day with this one.  That being the case and not minding the idea, I got comfy and watched the story unfold.

 

Alarm clock belonging to Sam goes off and we meet Sam.  Sam loves her friends Lindsay (Sage), Ally (Wu) and Elody (Rahimi).  She is always with them and them her.  They’re rich, spoiled and have no respect for anyone, including one another, but outside of sleeping, they’re pretty inseparable.  Like any group, there is a pecking order and though rather high in position, Sam isn’t at the top.  That honor goes to Lindsay who is anything but a likable person.  She’s mean-spirited, loves to watch people squirm as she puts them in their place and enjoys gossiping behind their backs the moment they turn around.  Unaware it happens to them, the pack ignores yet allows Lindsay to say and do as she pleases, as long as she’s nice to them.  As she does every morning, Lindsay picks Sam and the others up one by one and off to school they go.  However, this day is special; it’s different.  It’s Cupid’s Day and they can’t wait to see who receives the most roses throughout the day as this determines who is the most popular.

 

They go through their day as they usually do, being petty to parents and being mean to students.  Sam gets an invite to a party being thrown by her old friend, and the films nice guy, Kent (Miller) and the girls decide to attend.  At the party, Sam plans to lose her virginity to her boyfriend, Rob.  While there, however, she watches Rob get horribly drunk and act like a fool and decides not to go through with it.  Before leaving, the foursome drinks, do their usual teasing of a favorite victim named Juliet (Kampouris) and get in the car and go home.  An accident occurs and then; cut to alarm clock… and the day starts over.  Knowing the things that had happened throughout the day, you see where this is leading.  Sam isn’t Lindsay.  She isn’t mean at her core.  She’s more of an obliging witness where she may play a hand on occasion but would rather not.  If she isn’t dreaming, can she change things about her life?

 

The movie continues in this fashion for the rest of it.  Sam learns a little each time she wakes up to the same ugly day that awaits her.  Is she in hell?  Can she do the right thing and be redeemed?  Eventually, you notice one situation that she hasn’t necessarily made a big effort at correcting.  A slight attempt at a stand but not the true attack it needs.  Why?  Could be because she’d see where she was at fault for having created it in the first place.  Well, why is she on this day to begin with?  By the end of the film, she gets it but is it too late?  Are the answers in the actions she herself has made or in those of other people?  Will she now pay a price for not being a virtuous soul?  Will she have to sacrifice something herself to correct the course she’s now on?

 

I like that you don’t know these answers and that’s why I enjoyed the movie.  I would hate to categorize it as a chick flick but I think I have to.  The length of time spent with the teenage girls in the car, listening to music, hating on people and talking about boys makes it abundantly clear that the film wasn’t made for adult males.  The audience it was made for, the teenagers will absolutely love it.  Zoey Deutch is a good choice to play the sweet-faced martyr and Halston Sage does a good job of reminding us what we hated about high school more than even the homework.  If you’re a fan of dramas packed with mystery and wouldn’t mind the Mean Girls vibe, check out Before I Fall and look for all of the answers to the questions above.  Is she dead?  You tell me.

 


The Great Wall – Movie Review

 

Ever wonder why The Great Wall of China was built?  Well, wonder no more!  Matt Damon and director Zhang Yimou (House of Flying Daggers) present to you the reason.  Well, they offer one of the legends, actually, and I’m pleased to announce, it’s entertaining at the very least.  The Tag Line for the movie is “1700 years to build.  5,500 miles long.  What were they trying to keep out?”  Okay.  I’m fascinated.  What do you have in store for us?

What they have is something that’s a visual sensation.  What they achieve is hard to look away from so make sure you’re not going to have to have a potty break.  There’s a large army, complete with drums, which has protected China from attack for centuries, known as “Nameless Order.”  They’re dressed brightly and vividly which is odd for battle but they’re pretty all the same.  Another ocular wonder is what they’re fighting to save China from; a vicious horde known as the Tao Tei.  They’re huge and have massive limbs and hungry mouths with sharp teeth… the better to eat their multi-hued prey.  The enormous army has used arrows, spears, “black powder” (gunpowder) and acrobatics to defend themselves for ages and then… along comes a couple of European mercenaries to show them how it’s done.  They are William (Damon) and Tovar (Pascal).  Even though helping fight mythical creatures wasn’t exactly what they had in mind, it’s what is now on their plate.  Why they’re there is they heard of this mysterious black powder and figure they can fetch themselves a few bucks if they get their hands on some.  Their plan has just “hit a wall”, so to speak.

When they get to the wall, they’re seen as outsiders, of course, and are jailed immediately.  Then comes the horde that the army wasn’t expecting so soon, and who can shoot better than anyone?!  Guess!  I’ll wait.  You got it!  William.  So, he helps and they’re now trusted to roam free and offer their sage wisdom on how to defeat the terrible brood.  There’s also a woman William notices and she, him.  She’s Commander Lin Mae (Jing) who might not fully trust William but likes what she sees.  This is a good thing because after they show their charges the black powder and its uses, they cannot let their secret escape the barriers.  As a matter of fact, a white man by the name of Ballard (Dafoe) wandered up to find out about the powder and that was twenty-five years ago.  Well, at least he learned a second language and now he has some pals who might help him escape.

The 3D during the battle scenes is spectacular; worth the ticket price if you’re interested in dodging spears being thrown at your face.  However, when there’s downtime, it sort of pulls you out of the story and instead reminds you that you’re watching people on a movie set.  You can visualize the green screen behind them.  For the most part, it was eye-catching and made the film come alive during the epic fight scenes when people were diving off the wall, twirling through the air on bungee cords before bouncing back and when balloons were being used to get to the city to warn them of a probable attack.  What made this work is that outside of a hint of romance, Ballard wanting to escape and a power struggle between Tovar and William, the movie was all action.  It calls itself an action, thriller and it is one.  It’s a little slow to start but once it gets going, you’ll enjoy yourself for its beauty and style.  My guess is if you’re enthusiastic about anime and have a good time holding a controller in front of a screen, you’ll especially relish in the performance of Tian Jing who runs around looking like a character straight out of a Japanese line of games and toys.  If this sounds like you, check it out at a theatre but I’d make it to the matinee.  But be mindful of the fact that The Great Wall isn’t going to be great for all audiences.  It’ll be most admired by the younger generation so, mom and dad, drop off the kids and maybe run into something else… this one just might not be for you.


Fist Fight – Movie Review

 

Directed by: Richie Keen

Starring: Charlie Day, Ice Cube, Tracy Morgan, Jillian Bell, Dean Norris, Christina Hendricks, Dennis Haysbert and Kumail Nanjiani

Rated: R

Run Time: 1H 31min

Genre: Comedy

2 Frames out of 5

By: Shari K. Green

On the last day of the school year, all hell is breaking loose on school grounds.  Students, especially those in the senior class, are playing pranks on all the members of the staff.  They’re hiding things from their teachers, gluing items to their desks and getting down and dirty in an attempt to no doubt make their final high school day memorable… and possibly one-up the class that came before them.  They’re especially cruel to Principal Tyler, Breaking Bad’s Dean Norris, even going so far as to disassembling his car and putting it back together again inside the school.  There’s a lot going on in the background so don’t forget to pay close attention to what these wild youngsters have committed themselves to doing.  Director Richie Keen, (It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia) spent the time looking up ways to make this realistic by researching pranks done by real students in the past.  You’ll appreciate this attention to detail.

If you’re a fan of silly comedies, a fan of Charlie Day especially, you’ll want to check this out.  He does an exceptional job portraying the kind and fair English teacher, Andy Campbell.  When he rats on another teacher who loses his cool during class, Ron Strickland (Ice Cube), he is challenged to a fist fight and is now a man on the edge of a meltdown.  This is a comedy, right?  Well, the anger that comes from Strickland is so intense that you end up more or less feeling extremely sorry for Campbell which makes it hard to laugh to a large degree.  Some may think this doesn’t work well for a comedy.  Also, as far as character development goes, we never see any redeeming qualities coming from Strickland which may have helped you not dislike his character so much but unfortunately, as hard as you dig to find out where this anger is coming from, there’s simply nothing there.

Most eggs in Keen’s comedy basket relied on Day’s comedic abilities to hatch, both in a physical sense and how he conducts himself when he’s under pressure.  His strained voice is always worth a chuckle and it’s a blast observing him try to save his butt.  It’s also heartbreaking watching him; knowing the reason why the poor thing is running all over the place.  He goes to teacher after teacher and even calls 911, looking for a helping hand.  Some teachers he approaches are comedy gold.  Allow me to first mention one character that shouldn’t have existed at all and that’s Christina Hendricks’, Ms. Monet.  She comes out of nowhere and should have stayed there.  She really only served one purpose and not very well at that.  Keen did bring on Tracy Morgan (30 Rock) to be the stereotypical, simpleminded coach whose work here you’ll dig.  He also cast the witty Jillian Bell (Brides Maids) as Holly, the guidance counselor who can’t wait until certain students she’s been ogling from afar become legal and Kumail Nanjiani as a security guard who’s afraid of his own shadow.  These faculty members may have special talents in their own right but are of no use when it comes to advising someone on how to take a butt-whoopin’ or especially how to avoid it from happening.  Campbell must solve this mystery on his own.

A charming piece of the story is by way of the lesson Campbell learns.  I’m not speaking only of Andy but also of his daughter Ally (Alexa Nisenson).  In the same way that he is dealing with a bully at work, we are introduced to this character who is discovering life to be miserable at her own school.  When she finds the willpower to face her demons, by using a mic and the song I Don’t Give a F*ck by Big Sean, in a way you won’t soon forget, the movie finds the reason to be and is far better for it.  When Campbell finally musters the strength to confront Strickland, Keen presents a fist fight that will allow you to forgive most of the jokes you saw coming and some of the unnecessary gags that didn’t work.  When you see this, you’ll have fun picking out the obvious nods to films Keen must have liked, as well as his use of certain shots from them you may recognize.  All of this notwithstanding I can’t promote you pay to see this opening weekend at the theatre unless you make it a matinee.  Ultimately, the film has a good message regarding Campbells’ predicament.  He was always walked on and treated as though his opinion didn’t matter but standing up to this challenge makes him a better man and, at long last, a better teacher.

Subsequently, whether he wins the fight or he loses doesn’t matter… it’s all about the journey that he takes.  By the way, stay for the outtakes at the end.